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    •  
      CommentAuthorintim305
    • CommentTimeNov 29th 2016 edited
     
    this seems like the best spot for it so:

    (yes that is dollywood's DreamMore Resort, right down the road from the park)
    If any of you have been/would like to go to Dollywood, you might have to wait, a huge wildfire is in the area and has already taken down 150 some structures in Gatlinburg and Pigeon Forge.
    The park released a statement earlier today saying that it was fine so far and the website says they will reopen on Friday if all goes as planned.

    for those of you who have been there, you might recognize downtown Gatlinburg here:


    Just though it was worth some mention at least, I'm nerve wracked to say the least
    •  
      CommentAuthorOlmisery
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2016
     
    Hot damn, I hope Dollywood is alright after this.
  1.  
    It would be a shame if Lightning rod was destroyed by a Wildfire
  2.  
    ^I shouldn't laugh about that xD
    •  
      CommentAuthorOlmisery
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2016
     
    GOOD ONE.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKG9
    • CommentTimeNov 30th 2016
     
    Yeah that's pretty iconic right there ^^^ Hope everyone is okay and staying safe.
  3.  
    Maurer Spike Coaster Interview

    I haven't seen this posted here yet but I thought it was interesting enough to share.
  4.  
    https://gyazo.com/bc1636f8d928d84af389e59c722e357e
    Found this map of the area affected by the Gatlinburg wildfires, and it came WAY closer to the park than I was aware of. Crazy stuff.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbestdani
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2016
     
    Posted By: UtahCoasterRiderMaurer Spike Coaster Interview

    Thanks for sharing, now I'm even more interested in seeing these rides popping up.
  5.  
    So California's Great America's master plan is now under city review. Take a look at all the proposed goodies in there.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOlmisery
    • CommentTimeDec 11th 2016
     
    I'm actually really excited for this...
  6.  
    ^^this literally just made my day. I mean, a 245 foot hyper coaster going to my home park? Yes please
    • CommentAuthorTheBeatles
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016
     
    While I'm typically a fan of Universal's work, I'm having a difficult time trying to imagine a scenario in which this will look good IRL. Video games usually have full control over their lighting, colors, etc.

    https://gyazo.com/8d24982f7497e4276c9b35e2887757b0

    I'm interested, but skeptical. Meanwhile, Universal has also filed these patents:

    https://gyazo.com/5e109ed9c367a52924686fe46a288f4d

    https://gyazo.com/8d59f2fc8e194d5fcfa07089039dc2f3

    The first one is rumored to be for a Donkey Kong coaster, and the second is obviously reumored to be for a Mario Kart attraction.

    DEFINITELY excited to see what comes from the DK patent, it looks like a ton of fun.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMrcrolly
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016
     
    It looks like the mario kart attraction is going to be some sort of (guided rail) racing style ride similar to Test Track or Cars. The catch is that it'll have a drifting mechanism? I could, and probably am wrong, but that would be fun as hell.

    I'm also a tad confused on the donkey kong patent, Assuming it's a fake gag to give the illusion that your jumping rails? I'm curious on how they implement that into the experience
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016 edited
     
    ^ Yes you're right for both.

    There is also a third patent for a badass suspended dark-ride contraption:



    (It reminds me a lot of my own suspended, stand-up and interactive robocoaster idea, hehe)
    • CommentAuthorBigbad
    • CommentTimeDec 12th 2016
     
    I've always thought Bowser would be a good name for a coaster.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeDec 15th 2016
     
    Here is the Skywarp from Skyline Attractions as seen in Rstab, which is a structural analysis program. They are working on optimizing the support structure.

  7.  
    ^That's pretty sweet.
    • CommentAuthorKyle Sloane
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2016 edited
     
    Wow looking goodd.. :D
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2016
     
    Do you guys understand and can explain what we are looking at exactly? What are the squares and how do you read that?
    I guess the color on the footers shows the stress.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZergei
    • CommentTimeDec 16th 2016
     
    ^ My guess would be similar to the G-Force comb in NL2, but for the structure.
    • CommentAuthorJetPulse
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2016 edited
     
    It's an input rendering from some type of structural analysis software although I don't recognize the interface off the top of my head (edit: and now I see King said what it was...). Purple parts are a 3D representation of the structure itself. Supports appear too be rendered with their actual cross section and it looks like some representative cross section for the track itself. Footers are green.

    The white look like design loads applied to the structure for the analysis. It looks like this includes several design loads. You can see downward (gravity) loads pointing down and lateral loads point right and slightly up. Lateral loads appear to be from wind based on their relative magnitude along the structure. Gravity loads look primarily from live loads (train) from at least 2 different locations. When analyzing, they will take different subsets of those loads and apply them to the structure. Usually you would run 30-40 different combinations but since a roller coaster doesn't really see forces from some sources like normal structures (like rain, snow, and seismic) that number is probably reduced.

    There are no structural analysis results here though. They would use this type of analysis to optimize beam diameters and thinknesses to make design stresses in the members as close to their capacity as possible. Generally these types of analyses don't look at optimizing connections (flanges, footers, etc...) although this provides the forces at those joints that need to be considered for design.
    • CommentAuthorsbdb2099
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2016 edited
     
    Like King wrote this is (most likely, could also be RFEM) RSTAB from Dlubal. (RFEM is 3D finite element analysis software and RSTAB is basically the same, but reduced or specialized to frameworks only).

    In addition to what JetPulse said and for the ones interested in this:
    I would also say that the picture shows at least two load cases combined. Different load cases (dead weight, life loads like payloads, wind, snow, temperature, etc.) are entered separately with their characteristic values (so without partial safety factors which are 1,35 for dead weight and 1,50 for life loads in general. The safety factors on the load side are part of the so called semi-probabilistic safety concept. Besides increasing the load side the resistance side is decreased based on what material is used) and are also portrayed separately only.

    Different load cases portrayed together give an additional hint. This works only when the calculation is done with load combinations. That means, that you enter every possible combination of loads (or let the program do the job). For example:

    Combination 1: dead weight
    Combination 1: dead weight + payload
    Combination 1: dead weight + payload + snow
    .
    .

    Of course this can be optimized (and should be!) so that irrelevant combinations are sorted out. Otherwise you could end up having hundreds or thousands of combinations. The program offers very useful functions for that.

    But what i was going for with the hint was the way the calculation is done. Using load combinations indicates that they are calculating the internal forces on the deformed system. For example if one of the supports has a compressive force every deflection of it increases the internal bending moments. This can only be done by "feeding" the program with the actual design load values (= with safety factors) of one combination and is mostly done with frameworks.

    The other case would be to use action combinations where the load cases are calculated separately without safety factors and then are superimposed afterwards. This is a "simpler" method to determine internal forces and is used whenever it´s sufficient.

    Daniel :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeDec 17th 2016 edited
     
    Thank you so much guys for your input!

    Now I can read it. Correct me if I'm wrong, but essentially :
    The vertical squares are the weight of the track, running all around ; and the weight of the train, with more weight at the two stations where the parts with the seats are.
    The horizontal squares are the wind, impacting the track and supports.

    -

    I typed in "rstab coaster" in Google and found that, which is the "Representation of design ratio for fatigue design acc. to GB 50017 (1 kN = 1 %) on 3D model displayed in RSTAB" of Dragon Flight at Romon-U Park :



    Source

    -

    Edit: And here are some supports from Maceraperest at Vialand, as seen in Tekla Structure, another software.
  8.  
    i wish nl2 had some sort of stress overlay for supports.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZergei
    • CommentTimeDec 18th 2016
     
    ^ Well, there's a thread for sharing thoughts like that :p
    •  
      CommentAuthorOlmisery
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2017 edited
     
    "Just after 1am on the morning of January 25th, 2017, the Santa Clara City Council unanimously approved the 20-year master plan for California’s Great America. The plan includes an outside-the-park shopping district known as Great America Marketplace, along with a rezoning of the park from Thoroughfare Commercial (CT) to Commercial Development (CD) that would increase the park’s maximum ride height limit of to 250′. Below is a direct quote from pp. 6-7 of the meeting packet describing what exactly the Santa Clara City Council approved

    D. Great America Theme Park, 1 Great America Parkway (also 4701 Great America Parkway) – approximately 112-acre site:

    Adoption of a Resolution to certify an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) and adopt California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Findings and a Statement of Overriding
    Considerations and the Mitigation Monitoring or Reporting Program (MMRP), and
    Adoption of a Resolution to approve the rezoning from Thoroughfare Commercial (CT) to Planned Development (PD) to allow development of a Park Master Plan project that would continue to allow existing attractions, rides and operating practices and would provide flexibility to allow the development of new rides and replacement of rides and attractions, extension of the operating season, modified operating practices, additional hours of operation, and construction of a year-round commercial/entertainment district that would comprise up to 250,000 square feet of building space (100,000 new square feet beyond existing) that would be open to the general public outside of the theme park gates of the Great America Theme Park and amphitheater, subject to Master PD Zoning Use and Development Standards and conditions of approval.
    A rough idea of the Great America Marketplace can be seen in the below concept rendering as found on p. 898 of the meeting packet."



    CGA'S PLAN GOT APPROVED TODAY!
    •  
      CommentAuthorBattin
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2017
     
    Posted By: element 115i wish nl2 had some sort of stress overlay for supports.

    Well, that would certainly make placing supports alot more realistic.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeJan 26th 2017 edited
     
    So everyone is crazy with the Brachistochrone curve right now - which is this:



    ... and it reminded me something, an actual application in real life. I don't know if you remember, but NASA wanted to design an escape pod for their Orion launch pad. Currently they have a zip-line design:



    Which is basically a straight line.

    Then, they had this crazy idea to do a roller-coaster, called the Ares | Emergency Escape System (ESS):



    A vertical drop, a tight pullout and then a straight line. Quite a squarish shape, if you ask me.

    See what I did with the colors? NASA considered two solutions, but not the best one: the Brachistochrone curve! :D

    ...

    Well, actually they are not that dumb, because I think that's exactly what they are talking about right here, even if they don't mention it clearly (Path A):
    Posted By: NASAThe three day meeting considered the original concept, a proposed new designs, leading to the eventual winner, known as ‘Path A.’

    ‘Path C: Original Concept – Vertical Drop. This option follows NASA’s conceptual figure provided to the design team with the Statement of Work. A significant portion of the structural framing for the EES track is attached to the ML. This option results in significant G-forces on the passengers,’ noted associated information with the redesign.

    ‘Path B: Spiral Down Drop. The design team developed this path as a moderate G-force alternate to Path C. A large portion of the framing remains attached to the ML, but the spiral path reduces the G-forces on the passengers.’

    ‘Path A: Self-Supported. Another approach for the EES path was to limit the amount of track and structural framing attached to the ML. The result is Path A. This path has the lowest G-forces of the three and the fastest time to clear the ML area. It also requires more framing at LC 39B than the other two paths.’

    But it's quite amusing that their primarily focus was the G-forces, especially when you see how relatively low they are:
    Posted By: NASAThe change to the design came about primarily due to the previous concept having a 5G pullout for those riding on the cars away from the pad. The new design will see the occupants of the cars only having to endure 2Gs. It is understood that NASA’s Astronaut Office objected to the 5G option.


    I mean, the guys riding this contraption would be trained astronauts in an emergency situation, and 5G would be too much? It's even in the norm for the general public!


    And last but not least, they used NoLimits to do a simulation!
    Can you believe your are using, or were using since it's NL1, the same software as NASA?! How cool is that! :D


    Click on the image to download a short video.
    • CommentAuthorJAKool
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2017 edited
     
    They need to charge for rides on the EES when they aren't using the launch pad. I'd do it!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorganFan
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2017
     
    I mean I'd rather go to space but a NASA coaster would be cool.
    • CommentAuthorDelay
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2017 edited
     
    "National Auronautics and Space as well as Brachistochrone Safety system Administration"
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2017 edited
     
    I found a patent from 1902 depicting a kind of suspended coaster I guess, but what I find interesting is the lift mechanism:





    It's not easy to understand at first, but from what I get, it's like a giant tilted bullwheel, and the coaster follows the ascending half of it.

    Patent link

    -

    This another one is from Frederick Church in 1907, and from what I understand is a hybrid between a lift and... a launch!







    Bascially, there is this giant carousel in the center of the structure. The train enters from the center, the carousel starts rotating and pushes the train via the slanted beams (D). As the train ascends, it follows an inclined helix which get wider and wider. And what happens when the radius get wider but the angular velocity stays the same? That's right, you get faster!

    It actually works like the spiral lift from Mack or Zamperla, but there with an acceleration due to the triangular shape.

    Patent link
  9.  
    Hot damn that is one of the coolest launch concepts I have ever heard for a roller coaster!
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2017 edited
     
    Boom. Explosion of awesomeness.

    *

    New website for Intamin, incluing some nerdy stuffs for us to enjoy!

    Above you recognized the seats from Taron, and here is the frame of the train from the new inverted at Djurs:

  10.  
    I thought the Djurs invert was suspended. Guess not. Interesting.

    Also, that explosion of the Taron train assembly is AWESOME
    • CommentAuthorBigbad
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2017 edited
     
    I like some of the nerdy stuffs on there and am glad we finally get to see the names and locations (ish) of Intamin rides, but I generally find this layout inferior to what it was before and think they missed a big opportunity by continuing to omit names from pictures within each ride class.

    (It also looks like they've discontinued the AquaTrax.)
  11.  
    https://gyazo.com/8049ee1b1d45d69f4d87ee38de7fdcd1
    S&S Sansei just posted a concept video of what they call "Twisted Looper".

    In addition to this, they also uploaded EIGHT other concept coaster videos, ranging from El Locos to triple-launch family inverted coasters. CLICK for more

    This video shows off a potential new triple-launch El Loco for Linnanmaki.
    https://gyazo.com/41f0e12687753eaecaf6e4f10075a0fb
    EDIT: The video for the possible Linnanmaki coaster has been removed. Looks like someone slipped up
  12.  
    ...... :|
    • CommentAuthorInkyz
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2017
     
    Some of those are actually really cool.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2017 edited
     
    Triple launch... Triple launch everywhere...

    Also, beware of the mighty ROTISSERIE SWITCH:



    #feelthechickenbethechicken

    Camiel, I remember your non-inverting loop concept. Are you the one behind the NL simulations somehow? :D
    •  
      CommentAuthorRobotnik
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2017
     
    4^

    Is that bottom image NL1!?
  13.  
    Nope, thats most likely solidworks or one of the autodesk applications
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeFeb 9th 2017 edited
     
    ^ He's refering to the launch at Linnanmaki, and... well looking at the skybox it might be!

    -

    Uh-oh, this is embarrassing hehehe:



    Either rotate the end node by opening the rotation panel first, or make the very end an invisible segment, dammit! There's the same thing on the inverted ones, but it's most noticable here.
    • CommentAuthorTheBeatles
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2017
     
    There's no way that's NL1. Multiple coasters, flanges, even the lighting is far superior to what we had in NL1.

    Sure, the enthusiast superusers were able to import complex 3D models of coasters, add flanges, etc, but we're talking about a company that can't even use NL2 (far more user friendly than NL1) properly.

    If they were using NL1, it'd be painfully obvious
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2017
     
    ^ Indeed

    Posted By: TheBeatlesbut we're talking about a company that can't even use NL2


    Yeah that's a bit sad. I don't know if they hadn't the time for that, or if somehow NL2 is too complex to use (remember custom trains are not native), but that's a pity not to have the right tracks and trains, as well as the scripted features (switches, triple-launches...). I mean the Vekoma track, really?
    •  
      CommentAuthorbestdani
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2017 edited
     
    Posted By: KingRCT3Uh-oh, this is embarrassing
    Uhh ehh - I thought this was on purpose maybe visualizing some damaged rail effect. :-\
  14.  
    What on earth are the physics on the Dutch Wonderland Invert one ._.
  15.  
    I'd go work for them. They are only an hour from my house. Stan Checketts new company has contacted me before after seeing one of my videos.
    •  
      CommentAuthorOlmisery
    • CommentTimeFeb 10th 2017
     
    ^^ Play the video at 1.5 speed. It seems better then.