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  1.  
    Steel Vengeance looks amazing!
  2.  

    Here's a video of the latest redo of the layout for Energylandia's 2018 Intamin! There lot of modifications for the 2nd half that I personally like, especially the new airtime hill into the splash element, but I wish they could have kept the S-hill after the first small overbank instead of the regular airtime hill they have now.

    • CommentAuthorInkyz
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2017
     
    Somehow I hate that ending even more than the old one.
  3.  
    Why? It flows a lot better, and going through all those transitions in the outer seats will feel amazing
    • CommentAuthorInkyz
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2017
     
    Oh of course I'm not denying the experience will still be phenomenal, but the layout itself seems very uninspired. It looks like they could've used the space available in a more interesting way, it kind of just looks like they slapped a bunch of elements together in an order and were like "Hey, it'll do."
  4.  
    ^ Im inclined to agree with you. Its going to be a really fun coaster but i'm just finding the layout to not have that, special something?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMrcrolly
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2017
     
    Yeah I'm kinda in the middle too. Without doubt the coaster is going to be an incredible experience, and the first half (up to the overbank) is really damn good. But like Inkyz said the 2nd half feels somewhat weak. I'm going to hold back a solid opinion until I see actual tests of the ride since I'm sure it'll all come down to pacing.
    • CommentAuthorMrRC
    • CommentTimeOct 7th 2017
     
    I have strong feeling, some track parts (Station) have been shipped to PHL coz some parts are missing @ Vekoma Vlodrop as u can see in the next pictures :

    Aug 7th :




    Okt 6th :




    Maybe they gonna re-use some track parts of the test setup :

    • CommentAuthorInkyz
    • CommentTimeOct 12th 2017
     
    This isn't so much an update but rather a theory about SW8, and the theme surrounding it.



    So everyone knows about how this logo was trademarked with the name Wickerman, right?
    And Alton's new maze, The Welcoming, contains the same symbols but spelling out "Wickerman".
    This all points to a Wickerman theme, and the statue is also evidence of this.
    However, a movie called the Kill List (which is also about cults) bears a lot of similarities to what Alton has given us. Take a look;





    Is it just coincidence? It may be, but the background image has serious resemblance to the logo. Guess we'll just have to wait and find out.
    • CommentAuthorRyanTPM
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    ^The theme is the same, but I seriously doubt that SW8 will have anything to do with any film, and definitely not that one. The symbol in the background is to do with a cult, so it's all the same, but not directly linked. The same as the Wickerman films, and even The Ritual which has just been released, all the same theme and idea.
  5.  
    Yeah those two logos arn’t even remotely the same tbh, think you’re clutching at straws. They are both just generic “cult/demon” pentagram type affairs.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDanSm1l3r
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    One thing DEFINITELY worth noting about the connection that may/may not exist is that in 'The Welcoming', Alton's new scaremaze this year which they're dubbing the 'official prelude to SW8', there are actors close to the finale wearing masks almost identical to those seen in the last image Inkyz posted. Whilst I doubt the connection of the film and the ride, the resemblance of those masks to the ones in The Welcoming is uncanny.

    The maze itself is very very good by the way, sets the story for SW8 very well! :-D
    • CommentAuthorRyanTPM
    • CommentTimeOct 13th 2017
     
    ^Again, the masks are all to do with the cult style theme, they're this way in a lot of the films with this sort of plot line
  6.  
    In (late) reference to Energylandia's new Intamin design:

    It'll still be a great ride, but I strongly dislike the third iteration of the layout. I think the ending 20 seconds or so will be more exciting this way, but it's at way too much expense for the rest of the ride that was changed.

    I don't understand the tiny off axis hill (or whatever they call it) after the dive loop type element. Between the low Stengel and the S hill, then the interaction with the out run and supports, that section was amazing in the 2nd iteration. Going from the floater hill to the overbank now kills what I thought was going to be the sleeper hit of the ride, those flat S turns through the structure with the hop as an exclamation point. Now they're slower and more drawn out at the end of the ride, with much less interaction with structure. Then the low hill into the low Stengel just look sloppy to me. Seems their only goal there was to get themselves more space for a better ending, rather than making each section the best it can be.

    For me, the current iteration is like a solid NL design. The second iteration was a pro design.

    Oh well. Still gotta love a new 260' Intamin mega whenever something like this happens.
  7.  
    I still stick to my belief that the very first proposal was the best one. Visually it looked amazing, and it looked like it would've ridden the best. With every new rendition of this layout, they've been declining in quality imho.

    But I agree with DC up here, a 260' Intamin hyper is still a 260' Intamin Hyper.
    •  
      CommentAuthornolimiters
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017
     

    The size of that construction pit! :O
    • CommentAuthorMrRC
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017
     
    Is this a recent picture or from 3 weeks old ?
    •  
      CommentAuthorTobi
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2017
     
    This is an older pic, because thera are already mounted more track parts along the hall of Maus Au Chocolat.
    • CommentAuthorlore_sully
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2017
     
    :O :O :O :O

    And why there are still no photos of it? xD
    •  
      CommentAuthorJack
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2017
     
    Mainly because it's pretty much impossible to see over the construction walls and the ride is shielded by buildings elsewhere
    • CommentAuthorMrRC
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2017
     
    In Germany its not allowed to take pictures of other people / company property, something has to do with privacy law.
    • CommentAuthorlore_sully
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2017 edited
     
    Yes, i know, i'm following the construction from day one and i know fairly well Phantasialand :)

    My message was partially a joke, and partially a real question because there are already photos of the construction site, as you know, and if there is track on the side of maus au chocolat it means that it should be visible from where other photos have already been taken. It should be in line with the gate from where the picture posted from nolimiters was shot. The building that you see right in front of the camera is maus au chocolat. Anyway, to shoot this photo you have to find the gate on the street open, so it's not so easy.







    In this map i made you can see where the track that we've already seen is placed (the red square) and the gates from where the above photo and the following one were taken (respectively blue and green arrows).

  8.  
    Parc Saint Paul has announced a new Gravity Group woodie called Wood Express for 2018! Click for more
  9.  
    nice name.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBolt789
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    Wow, they packed a ton of airtime into that small footprint.
  10.  
    Up, down, up, down, turn.
    Up, down, up, down, turn.
    Up, down, up, down, turn.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    Yeah, the layout has no shape nor is original... But lot of airtime tho, which is fine.

    However, go ride it the very first day of opening, or never. Gravity Group coasters can age badly when not well maintained.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBolt789
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    This is a good time to ask a question I've always had. What does wooden coaster maintenance involve?

    We all know what a well maintained woodie rides like (Jack Rabbit, for instance, is still smoother than a lot of steel coasters I've ridden and provides just as much airtime now as it did upon its opening), and we all know that Six Flags and Cedar Fair tend to let their woodies go to crap, leaving them rough and airtimeless. However, what is involved in the maintenance process that allows coasters to maintain a good ride experience over decades?
    •  
      CommentAuthorMillennium
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    ^ I know from experience that good upkeep involves inspecting the track and supports every day, doing a track walk, and repairing spots as necessary when the issue is found. A little bit of warping or rot is what kills the smoothness, so parks have to be willing to replace parts of the wood on a daily basis, if needed. It's funny to see where they stop caring, for example CP will do carpentry work for supports like Gemini's often enough because it's necessary to keep the ride from being unsafe, but apparently won't take extra effort in replacing the wood on the track for Mean Streak, which is where the roughness really hits.
  11.  
    As far as my knowledge goes, most (if not all) parks will have maintenance walk the entire track every morning checking for anything out of the ordinary and fixing anything that is an easy fix. Then there is the more crucial part when it comes to maintaining the ride for years and years: the off-season work. Retracking of parts that are particularly rough is done. The parks that better maintain their wooden coasters simply put more time and effort into retracking, as well as train maintenance, in the off-season.
    •  
      CommentAuthorBBSpeed26
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017 edited
     
    Among other things - you budget to rebuild the rough parts, all the time. You contract with or hire & train carpenters to know how to take care of your stuff. Buying a wooden coaster, if you know what you're doing, should also include an annual budget to keep it running well. Skimp on that and it shows.

    Good trains *and* high initial construction quality go a long way towards it too.

    I would argue that GG and GCI both have "good trains" that at least theoretically "track well" and shouldn't be as damaging to track over the long run as older style trains like PTCs, Century Flyers, etc. That *should* allow for rides to require less ongoing maintenance than the same ride run with, say, PTCs. How aggressive a ride is also factors in, and it stands to reason that a ride with more high stress sections would age & get rough more quickly than one without. The Jack Rabbit, to use your example, really only has... 4 areas of potential roughness on the whole ride - at the bottom of each valley. You bet that Kennywood gets out there semi-regularly to redo the track in those areas - I'd be interested to hear exactly how often (paging KPJB), but it's not uncommon to see fresh wood down there. Kennywood is also a park that is more dedicated to their woodies than most. Case in point: every offseason, Kennywood rebuilds a Jack Rabbit car. Not refurbishes - starts from scratch and rebuilds. Frame, seat cushions, everything. Hades & Mt. Olympus are basically the other end of the spectrum. The ride is in effect a non-stop high stress area, and Mt. Olympus is (among other things) notoriously terrible at maintaining their woodies, so even after the partial retracking and switch to Timberliners that happened a few years ago, it's laughably rough and not in danger of getting any better any time soon.

    Which is a good reminder that good trains don't solve everything, and there's a reason you don't see places buying Timberliners or Millennium Flyers to 'save' their rough woodies. Look at the failed experiments on each side: TGG put Timberliners on Hades without doing a full retrack, and the result was a ride that was at least as rough, if not rougher than it was with PTCs. Holiday World basically turned Voyage into a multi-year test track for Timberliners and... never bought them. Turns out that if the track isn't smooth to begin with, a train that expertly adheres to the curves of the track is also going to expertly adhere to the bumps and jolts and lumpy turns leftover from PTC-damage and/or poor initial construction. Gwazi getting Millennium Flyers is the GCI example of good trains not fixing the problem, and I would hazard a guess is the reason that, at last check, GCI doesn't seem to be in the business of putting Millennium Flyers on rides that they haven't also been hired to do a full retrack of. That brings me to...

    Construction quality.That could be everything from proper reinforcements in high stress places (e.g. beefier track stacks and denser bent spacing) to "how smooth is the ride on day 1."

    The latter is something I've only recently started considering, in large part after getting some more experience with new and aging GCI and TGG rides. I'm becoming more and more convinced that TGG is being let down by their relatively poor initial fit & finish (to borrow a term from the automotive industry) when it comes to track construction, or their partners lack of it. A new TGG ride tends to be bouncy and lumpy in places that no new ride should be. Mine Blower, to use a recent example, was a bouncy mess from day one. Go watch some reverse POVs from opening day. Every third thing you feel on that ride is a jarring bump that communicates "that was not a 'designed' force." New GCI rides are nearly as chaotic in terms of forces (at least as much if not more in terms of frequency of force change, if not so much in outright intensity), but in between every snappy direction change is a smooth curve, hill, shove, etc. Sure the transitions happen in split seconds and throw you around, but you don't feel like you're feeling each bent as you pass over it, or getting repeated slams as you round a turn that's supposed to be, you know, a smooth turn.

    And then you have old TGG rides like Ravine Flyer II that were aggressive as hell, yes, but smooth on day 1, and are still smooth, even with PTCs. Whether that's a testament to Waldameer or whoever built RFII, I don't know, but I'd like to see TGG address that going forward. I honestly think it's something that's holding them back from being a front-running choice for medium-to-large scale woodies in the states, and that's a shame, since I sort of love their layouts and approach to wood coaster pacing, especially when they have some size to work with.

    Anyway.

    ...what were we talking about? Wood coaster maintenance?
    •  
      CommentAuthorParadox
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    Wooden Warrior is still smooth and runs great after 6 years, but I am not sure how much maintenance they do on it.
  12.  
    I would also love to see better construction work for TGG woodies. I like their style better than GCI, and like you said, if they could build them smoother, then their full potential could be seen and they would appeal to a broader audience. I need to see more large scale TGG's somewhere other than China.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017 edited
     
    I once heard the maintenance for a wooden coaster is almost the cost of one new coaster every year, AKA it's massive. Daily routine fixing bolts and nuts (easy peasy... if you have the team for), and off-season retracking that involve professionals. Walygator hired a thrid-party for Anaconda, a group of specialized alpinist workers called Voltige - but they had no experience with wooden coasters. As a result, the retracking was worse than before... They get back with GCI as soon as possible.

    This is a great time to plug this awesome interview of James Swinden (GCI) by CoastersWorld, and he does imply that wooden coasters need a lot of maintenance as wood is an organic material.

    (Side question: What does he reffer to when he says "batter lines"?)
    •  
      CommentAuthorBolt789
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2017
     
    Very informative answers. I learned a lot today, thanks guys!

    Next I'll check out that video posted by King.
  13.  
    ^^Batters are what GCI calls their low to the ground wide supports (examples below), so keeping them in a line makes them looks symmetrical and clean.
    https://gyazo.com/5c6ad9846c8ca28804021c9d62ebebd3
    https://gyazo.com/8dca9ba59b128cf07e37c204c41e36b8
  14.  
    Speaking of wooden coasters. Lagoon's 1921 wooden Roller Coaster is rumored to be receiving new trains. No word on from who but Lagoon's recent trends it is possible we could see some custom trains built by Lagoon and ART Engineering. Hoping this comes true as the trains are 40 years old and are horrible.
    • CommentAuthorAyTrane
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2017
     
    Posted By: CoasterMac305^^Batters are what GCI calls their low to the ground wide supports (examples below), so keeping them in a line makes them looks symmetrical and clean.


    Thank you for recognizing the aesthetics; it makes me feel like my hard work isn't going to waste!
  15.  
    ^Oh yeah, there is no denying that GCI's are beautiful to look at!
    • CommentAuthorlore_sully
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2017 edited
     
    New video of FLY at phantasialand:

    youtube video
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    Posted By: CoasterMac305^^Batters are what GCI calls their low to the ground wide supports

    Only the lowest ones? Not the taller ones? Thanks for the anwser!

    @AyTrane: It's not secret GCI cares as much for aesthetics as on-board sensations! And that's why we love them. I think I first heard that in a documentary on Kentucky Rumbler, when they said they made this certain turn higher only for aesthetics.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDanSm1l3r
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017 edited
     
    Drone footage of SW8

    Interesting video from ITV news on SW8 featuring some drone footage of the ride.
    •  
      CommentAuthorParadox
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    "Guys we are getting a family coaster how do we hype that up?"

    "PROMOTE THE EXPERIENCE NOT THE RIDE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!"
    • CommentAuthornSeven
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    Wow, the Alton Towers GP is shockingly stupid.

    I thought we had stupid people in America....and we do....but you brits take the cake.
  16.  
    Always good to be ahead of the Darwinian curve :)
    •  
      CommentAuthorParadox
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017
     
    If SW8 crashes that would be hilarious.
  17.  
    ^^^Are you referring to the comments?
    •  
      CommentAuthoriSatnav
    • CommentTimeNov 2nd 2017 edited
     
    https://gyazo.com/2f5dbf920d4c94445345662a13d5df8a

    RIP DCA, 2k01-2k18. Killed by Pixar.

    UPDATE: It's called the Incredicoaster.
  18.  
    RIP Disney
  19.  
    ^^ and ^ Context, california screaming is being rethemed to the incredibles and it looks quite bad

    Whole pixar pier article here: https://disneyparks.disney.go.com/blog/2017/11/pixar-pier-to-bring-new-incredicoaster-and-more-to-disney-california-adventure-park-summer-2018/