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    • CommentAuthorA113
    • CommentTimeSep 9th 2016 edited
     
    Hi everyone,

    I'm pursuing a thesis project on theme parks and narrative experiences as part of my last year of architecture school, and as part of my research I'm curious to hear the opinions of the community on theme parks and rides.

    I ask that you put your enthusiasm aside and try to think deeply about the following and how any or all of the following affect you:

    -Why do you think attractinos/rides exist?
    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?
    -Are stories important to you?
    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?
    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?
    -Do you think there are different uses for them?
    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?
    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?

    Responses can be either brief or thorough introspection, either are honestly appreciated.
  1.  
    Hmm. Those are some deep questions.

    - I think I like rides for their unique sensations (airtime and inversions, mainly, since you rarely get that with anything else in the world) and the slight adrenaline rush.
    - I love it when things have a backstory and are themed nicely around it, but I also don't mind a generic coaster as long as the layout is fun (path interaction is good, too).
    - They're basically like any other tourist destination. They attract people (and money) and those people have an enjoyable day. They're not essential in life, but they help people break away from the norm.
    - Liseberg.
    - Don't quite get that question.
    - Hopefully they get more technologically advanced so they create even more unique sensations (the drop track of TH13TEEN, for example, was a fairly substantial innovation in my opinion, especially for people who don't expect it. I'd love more trick tracks like that).
    - Because they make people happy? Hard to say, really.
  2.  
    1) I'd say I like rides for the fun they can give you. It doesn't have to be anything specific just something that you come off of happier than when you got on.
    2) Stories aren't really the most important part. The important thing is enjoyment, and while a story can sometimes add to it its not always necessary.
    3) Amusement parks and rides can have big impacts on society. Providing wealth to surrounding areas while giving people entertainment and letting them get away from the world.
    4) If theres room
    5) Maybe some kinda therapy? I'm not really sure, but it could maybe help people relax or something.
    6)Honestly I get the feeling roller coasters and thrill rides are eventually going to be gone completely. They'll be completely replaced by cheaper VR experiences or other things like that.
    7) there can be lots of different reasons. Some people may just like the thrill, while some might be nostalgic about their childhood.
    • CommentAuthorTheBeatles
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016
     
    -The first thing that comes to mind when you ask that is a mental image of a bogie with the wheels turning extremely fast. A lot of us grew up liking trains/railroads, and I think roller coasters just kind of evolved from that. Roller coasters are just trains that do faster/crazier maneuvers.
    -Stories are very important to me. A story can turn a normal drop tower into Disney's best attraction. However, there's also something to be said for the industrial beauty of a naked steel structure (See: Hollywood Rip Ride Rockit and The Smiler).
    -Attractions are totally important in any society. Rides make people feel physical sensations that would be nearly impossible to replicate in any other way. They ease stress, and depending on their intensity, can put a smile on anybody's face.
    -There is definitely a place for coasters within cities. I LOVE seeing Manhattan Express at the NYNY hotel in Las Vegas, it's a gorgeous (albeit rough) coaster. Like anywhere else, if they're integrated well, they can be an amazing addition to any urban area.
    -For me personally, roller coasters teach me new things (ex: they've been my gateway into physics), provide countless hours of enjoyment, and can even be used as a medicine.
    -As Coasterfan312 said, I think roller coasters themselves will stay more or less the same for the foreseeable future. If you compare some of the first roller coasters to what we have now, there's virtually no conceptual difference, we just have the technology to push more boundaries now.
    -People should care about these experiences because they change lives. For many of us (like myself), they've proven to pretty much be my purpose for existing. I've never loved anything more than I love theme park rides. I honestly believe that everyone loves amusement attractions in one way or another. Maybe you don't enjoy roller coasters, but Jungle Cruise could be one of your favorite adventures. It's different for everyone, but excitement/thrill is one of the many attributes that all humans share, regardless of age, sex, race, geographical location or any other differentiation. I could ride a roller coaster with a 50 year old woman from Bangladesh, and I'm fairly certain we'd still be able to connect on the experience.

    I don't know if ANY of that last answer made sense, I'm sick and tired. Please forgive
    •  
      CommentAuthorZergei
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016 edited
     
    I'll write something here in a while, and update this post. I'd like to pitch in :)

    Edit: my post is down a bit!
    • CommentAuthorJAKool
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016
     
    Why not just post it when you have the stuff to write?
    • CommentAuthorMaverick
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016
     
    Firstly, congratulations on getting to your final year. It seems like just yesterday that you were starting college.

    I am going to be concise with my answers. I am using my phone to respond.


    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?

    I like the ability to offer a "full experience" to the guests. But what catches MY attention with these attractions is how a person can be manipulated in such a way that it alters their reality, in a sense.

    -Are stories important to you?

    Absolutely. But that doesn't mean they need to be deep or in-depth.

    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?

    Not at all. They are forms of entertainment.

    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?

    Of course. Just as there is a place for a theater, or arcade, etc.

    -Do you think there are different uses for them?

    Other than entertainment? Possibly, on the interactive spectrum of attractions.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?

    I think interactive augmented reality is the next major step.

    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?

    I don't know if they should care. If you can use it as a teaching tool, then it becomes valuable.

    I hope this can help a bit. I would gladly discuss the future of the entertainment industry any time.
    •  
      CommentAuthorminuseven
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016 edited
     
    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?

    Aside from the sensations you experience while riding, I think there's a certain beauty to a well designed ride: whether it be the gracious heart lining of a B&M Hyper, or the choreographed spins and twirls of a unique flat ride. The engineering and design behind it is what attracted me to enthusiast-tier knowledge.

    -Are stories important to you?

    Not really. A ride with a story is always fun, but it isn't needed.

    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?

    In a way, sure. It may be entertainment, but entertainment is a huge industry, which brings in a lot of money. Not to mention, amusement parks create many jobs and give joy and fun times to the public.

    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?

    Maybe not in the city core, but I think an amusement park should be placed relatively near a populated area to reach as many people as they can. That way, they can serve their purpose better. Big entertainment centers always have a place within a city. Individually though, I think rides can go wherever they're put, as long as there's a reason for it to be there. I think Thunder Dolphin for example is an awesome ride, and it fits in its place. I like to think of them as landmarks or static art.

    -Do you think there are different uses for them?

    Maybe rides can be used as an educational thing? A ride for young kids (5 and up maybe?) that has an informative but true storyline to go with it would be cool. Like a shooting ride or something.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?

    I don't think it's VR, I'll tell you that much. I find lots of parks have gimmicky features, so I can imagine the day once we get rid of those gimmicks, we can have some really interesting new rides being developed. It seems to me Intamin is starting to experiment with some new designs, and Vekoma's working on some interesting stuff as well. I think the future is bring with innovation.

    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?

    Sure! Fun is fun, and everyone likes fun. Whether you're a casual park-goer or an amusement park enthusiast, I think anyone can have a good day at an amusement park if they know where to put their expectations, and from there they can have good memories and lots of fun. People care about that!


    Cool questionnaire. Thanks for posting it here!

    Posted By: Coasterfan312 (the drop track of TH13TEEN, for example, was a fairly substantial innovation in my opinion, especially for people who don't expect it. I'd love more trick tracks like that).

    I went on Wonder Mountain's Guardian for the first time last summer. I was completely unaware that it had a drop track. One of the best ride experiences I've had in ages, that one moment.
  3.  
    I love riding coasters for the insane amount of joy you get. I came off maelstrom and rollercoaster(GY) stunned by how fun they were i was laughing and smiling so hard. I also love height speed and a truly out of control ride.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbestdani
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016 edited
     
    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?
    Because they are machines / constructions that are built to trigger certain emotions like mostly happiness and fear with the main goal that users are happier after visiting / riding these attractions than before. It's also interesting that a combination of a wide range of science fields like psychology, sociology, engineering are included to do this. Because of the construction's purpose these science fields are used to do some kind of "art" with them instead of doing something "neccesary". It's also interesting to see different approaches to reach that goal, some are simple but effective constructions some are high tech ones, there's very often also some kind of innovation / experiment involved in each attraction.

    -Are stories important to you?
    Storytelling can also be an important factor included in the final product but it can also work without that contribution.

    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?
    In my opionion they have about the same importance and benefit like any other cultural product like sports, music, theatres, cinemas and the technologies linked to that. The expertise gained by errecting amusement attractions is most likely also useful for more essential constructions in some cases.

    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?
    There are already cities that use permanent amusement constructions and many cities organize funfairs sometimes multiple times in a year with transportable amusement attractions, which are a very important culutural event that also generate a whole tourism economy in some cases, yes.

    -Do you think there are different uses for them?
    While happiness (sometimes resulting from a special kind of fear) is mostly the goal of amusement attractions they can be also used to trigger other emotions like sadness or consternation. They can be also used to train expertice in different kind of fields. They can to a certain amount even be used as a political instrument.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?
    Some forms might vanish and some new forms might pop up. There are to many factors to speculate about the future.

    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?
    Because the most aspects I wrote before are mostly positive ones and there are much more positive aspects than negative ones.
  4.  
    Posted By: TheBeatlesA lot of us grew up liking trains/railroads, and I think roller coasters just kind of evolved from that. Roller coasters are just trains that do faster/crazier maneuvers.

    Ermegherd, that's totally what happened with me :o
    Didn't know it was the same for loads of others.
    • CommentAuthorDelay
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016
     
    ^I'm not the only one who liked trains when he was young(er)? Life goal reached!

    (I told you I'm not crazy, Dad!)
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeSep 10th 2016
     
    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?

    I like the duality between the mechanical beast they are, and all the artistic efforts made to cover that up. Even if it'sa raw like, like a hyper coaster or a fairground flat-ride, it is painted and presented in a way you don't think that, in hindsight, it's a big piece of industrial machinery.
    I also love the plurality of fields theme park attractions require in their design. It's like filmmakers + theater people + enginneers + architects + many many more...


    -Are stories important to you?

    Yes and no.
    Yes when I'm at home thinking about what would be the ultimate park experience I'd love to see.
    No when I'm at a theme park, I just want to ride the ride and don't care about the lenghty preshows, unless it has some cool visual effects in it. And I usually don't get storyline while I'm riding a ride, I only see what that was about if I read it later online.
    So ultimately, the best thing is to have a simple story that can be comprehensive the first time you ride a ride, and a great storyline that can make a ride legendary because people will discuss it and dig further and further and can even create a fandom around it thanks to the material distilled throught the exeprience (Phantom Manor comes to mind).


    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?

    Entertainment is really important and beneficial. As attractions are entertainment, the answer would be yes. But unlike movies where people get really passionnate about, they are more like mindless distractions.


    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?

    Maybe sometimes. But quickly, stand-alone attractions can't survive on their own, and complexes are made... which in a way are amusement parks, so...
    Some exceptions would be a ferris wheel or observation tower, but that's for touristic cities.


    -Do you think there are different uses for them?

    They are for entertainment, which can help in various domains (having fun, relieve stress, leaving the real world, tighten the bonds between persons, ect.), but for attractions that mostly it.
    I can consider them as an art form... not necesarily for their look, but because art is meant to leave an impression on you. And what a range of emotions an attraction can left on people! From anticipation, to stress, to nervosity... and then adrenaline, enjoyement, blissfulness, and finaly the sensation of overcoming one's fears.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?

    Their future will depend on the world economy, which is sad. Maybe big resorts will grow as maintaining a complex will be difficult for small businesses, or maybe smaller amusement parks will emerge everywhere because people will not be willing to spend a week abroad but rather a day or an afternoon at the local park.
    My personnal utopia though, would be that theme parks and their attractions become the main medium of a piece of art.
    Let's take an exemple: When you think about Harry Potter, what do you think it is? The answer is either a serie of films or books. I know that, originally, it's the books. But the cinema gained that authority in people's mind, and it's now hard to picture Hogwart anything else than what was pictured in the movie, and Harry Potter not looking like Daniel Radcliff.
    Now, anything else related to Harry Potter is a side-product. Comics, plushes, toys, theatrical plays... or theme park attractions.
    I dream of a theme park that would not be "a sample of this and that", but be the thing. And then, THEN, people would write books or make films about the univers it created.


    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?

    They shouldn't. You see, one thing I like about the amusement industry is how humble the field is (or is forced to be, perhaps, but the point still stand). Nobody knows the name of who did this ride, designed this coaster or whatever. It's something that is given to them. And that's the magic.
    Ride designers are the ones who should care. People should only profit.

    --

    I don't know if any of this makes sense, actually.
    • CommentAuthorBullero
    • CommentTimeSep 11th 2016 edited
     
    Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?

    It's a great way to escape from everyday life. As a mechanical engineer, I like how humanity creates machines to amaze us and emerge us into a story-line. A great ride is a combination of technology and a fitting story line.

    Are stories important to you?

    Yes, I do enjoy a ride more when it emerges you into a story line. I'm not saying that every ride should have an elaborate story, but some basic form of immersion into a story adds a lot of value to the ride in my opinion.

    For me, the ride experience starts around 25 meters before the queue. You see the ride, people around you are starting to get excited about that ride. When that initial pump of excitement is over, you start to emerge yourself into a story by entering the queue. This queue should be the buildup to a climax: the ride itself.

    Most rollercoasters do not have some kind of (elaborate) story, and that is ok. Example: the Hollywood Rip Rode RockIt story 'we are shooting a video clip inside a rollercoaster' is completely fine for that type of ride.(except for that annoying safety spiel).

    When rides are ment to be story driven, you have to make sure the story is simple enough to be understandable for first-time visitors and elaborate enough to emerge you.
    One problem with that comes with rides that are based on existing story lines (from movies), and make no sense with some kind of background knowledge of that story.

    I would like to take this opportunity to describe my love/hate relationships with priority queues and single rider queues: yes, they do have their uses. Personally I don't like paying to skip queues, but if there is a market for that: go for it. And single rider queues are great to use the maximum capacity of the ride, and are extremely handy for groups where just one individual wants to ride a ride. So why do they hate them? Most priority/SR queues are separate from normal queues and theme parks don't bother to theme them as well. This breaks the line of story telling: you skip the build up. That is fine in non-story driven ride. But with story driven rides, it gives an incomplete experience in my opinion.

    Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?

    Yes: theme parks and rides in general are great stress relievers. They also give a lot of people a job.

    Do you think there is a place for them in a city?

    Yes, amusement rides as a standalone can be a great addition for tourists. Not only as lookout points (Ferris wheels) but also as a way to tell the history / myths and sagas of a country (Amsterdam / London Dungeon for example).

    Do you think there are different uses for them?

    I don't think so: rides are mostly here for entertainment purposes. I would love a rollercoaster to transport me from home to work though ;)

    What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?

    Expansion into multi-day/weekend getaways. More story driven rides because the technology for media becomes cheaper. I hope to see more user interaction in theme parks: exploring themed areas, user participation in rides and stories. It has been said earlier, but I do not think VR is the future: it is too individual in my opinion.

    Why should people care about these types of experiences?

    Only if they want to. Some people like books, some people do not. Some people like amusement parks, some people do not.

    I would love to read your thesis when it is done. Please keep us updated!

    Edit: just did a spell check, original post was from my phone
    • CommentAuthorA113
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2016
     
    Thanks for the responses, everyone. It's especially helpful when a conversation is generated. I added a question to the original post which is, "why do you think rides exist?" Feel free to add on any observations, opinions, or insight of any kind.
    •  
      CommentAuthorKingRCT3
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2016
     
    Why do you think attractions/rides exist?

    Like almost everything out here, I think it was a long process that eventually lead where we are now. People needed entertainment, and that might as well have started like this. So basically, the question is the same as "why people want to have fun and play games?".

    Now in thrill rides, there is thrill. The majority of amusement rides have this common factor to search for the exhilarating factor. I think it's because people seek the unusual, something that they can't get in their everyday life, just like extreme sports, minus the skills and time those require. There is also the self-surpassing feeling that can affect oneself positively, both for self-esteem and within a social environment.
    •  
      CommentAuthorZergei
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2016 edited
     
    -Why do you think attractions/rides exist?
    They mainly exist for entertainment, thrills, and profit.

    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?
    I like to see detail and an amazing experience overall. I love seeing special effects, especially practical ones (like in Kongfrontation)! I believe in the Imagineer's practices, which involves creating a highly detailed environment and an experience you will never forget.

    -Are stories important to you?
    Very. As long as they are easy to follow and make you feel like you are part of the action, they are extremely important. Even a loose storyline that stays with the theme works, as long as its logical.

    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?
    They bring in lots of tourists to areas, and open up more opportunities for business. They provide entertainment and memories for all those who experience them, and can be things that people will take their kids someday.

    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?
    There are occasionally well made parks in the middle of cities, but most often I would say they should be in less crowded areas, allowing for more land and growth overtime.

    -Do you think there are different uses for them?
    You have all sorts of attractions, and I do prefer attractions in which you are indoors for at least a good portion of it. Roller coasters are great too, though many don't have Disney level of theming. They are awesome for thrill seekers like the majority of us on this site, and can be changed in size and layout to pander to different demographics.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?
    Someday, there may be maglev coasters, rides that fly, and virtual reality without headgear. There are so many possibilities!

    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?
    They support local business, inspire people, take them to new worlds in safety, improve mood, thrill, and so much more!

    p.s. this is written by someone who is trying to become an Imagineer, which is why a lot of this is based on high level experiences.
    Also, are you going to finish your California Screamin' recreation in NL2? I absolutely loved the preview in NL1!
    •  
      CommentAuthorintim305
    • CommentTimeSep 13th 2016 edited
     
    you guys are thinking about this wayyy too economically...

    -Why do you think attractions/rides exist?
    Pleasure of course. To answer more fully I'd go back to the origins of coasters in the russian ice slides. Everyone went sledding as a kid, most of us still do, because it's fun as hell. Coasters are basically just metal, safer and wilder sleds that work all year (but ironically not in the snow)

    -Why do you like attractions/rides? Anything specific catch your attention?
    I ride and continue to ride for that feeling of being on a ride. It's simulated danger to most, but to me it's extremely calming. Being on a coaster means I don't have to worry about anything else no matter how stressful, and the feeling of flying through the air without having to worry about dying is just so calming and serene and something I haven't been able to find anywhere else. It's an escape to be simple. (also having engineers as parents gives me a certain appreciation for the beauty both from a physical, structural and mechanical standpoint.

    -Are stories important to you?
    As far as theming on a ride, not really. If the story greatly enhances the experience and makes the ride overall a lot more enjoyable then yes, but for something bigger where the focus is just on being big, then no not on the ride at least.

    -Do you think attractions/rides are important or beneficial to society?
    Hell yes. Aside from being a major business they can cause a lot of happiness that other things can't even begin to.

    -Do you think there is a place for them in a city?
    Of course, Everything from a publicity stunt to short distance transportation (or more likely both). I've actually put a lot of thought into using coasters as a system of transportation and have come up with some pretty neat ideas for it to work (I'll probably post about it eventually)

    -Do you think there are different uses for them?
    What I said in the last one, Transportation. At the moment coasters are purely for entertainment and just go around in a circle, but why not actually go places? coasters have notable improvements over trains such as the ability to slow down and speed up much faster, and the physical inability to derail, making high banking and inversions possible which allows for tighter turns at higher speeds in a smaller space (sounds pretty great right?), and that's not even mentioning how fun it would be. These benefits could even continue beyond the transportation of people to manufactured goods.

    -What do you think the future holds for these types of structures?
    I'm not sure to be honest. Any sort of economical decline and theme parks are probably one of the first things to go, but if coasters extend outside the use of theme parks would a park lose it's appeal and coasters become more dull yet more practical?

    -Why should people care about these types of experiences?
    Because they are rare and super special. I can't think of any other way to spiral down 400ft with a 100% chance of not dying, especially for less than $100. It's a rush and maybe it's terrifying, but it's also perfectly safe. Sure you could go skydiving or drag racing for the same thrill but that isn't a guaranteed safety, plus you need much more money and skill to do either of those.
    • CommentAuthorA113
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2016 edited
     
    Thanks everyone for their input from months back, I recently completed the first half of my thesis year, otherwise known as "thesis prep", and wanted to share some of the progress with you all even though a lot of what you will see below is a bit "out there". I'm going to be as concise and clear as I can possibly be, because one of my main goals was to merge the world of theory in architecture with amusement rides, which all of us on here love and are familiar with. If you have any interest or questions, please ask away! The working title of this project is "Pleasurescapes".

    Just a note before you read ahead: This is currently an exploratory and speculative thesis, I'm looking at possibilities rather than offering a solution.

    Short story verision, my research has directed me toward investigating how "mechanized conveyances" (which includes ride systems like ferris wheels and people movers, and transit systems like funiculars, escalators and cable cars) can be used to create a pleasurable and alternative method of movement in the middle of the city. In other words, I'm using rides to create an alternate destination in the middle of the city... think of the High Line in New York City, it is an urban park that is both an escape and an alternate urban experience. For this project, I'm using the skybridges in Minneapolis as an opportunity to create "scenic/detour" bridges that infact use ride and transit technologies that are essentially combinations of the 16 below. (From Top Left to Bottom Right: Rail, Transporter Bridge, Roller Coaster, Street Car, Omnimover, Enhanced Motion Vehicle, Robotic Arm, Ferris Wheel, Elevator, Revolving Restaurant, Escalator, Moving Sidewalk, People Mover, Funicular, Cable Car, Monorail).

    http://i.imgur.com/CteNPfH.jpg
    (click image for higher resolution)

    From this I have made three different tests (and I mean, really really absurd tests) of variations on the revolving restaurant. The example below is meant to act more as a people mover and move throughout the city, which is a rough vision of what this project may end up being. By doing this I'm essentially saying that we should question the way we look at transportation and "rides" to accommodate functions such as dining, hotels, and other forms of leisure-use. As you can see from the image, this is a continuous chain of restaurant booths moving on a path varied in x, y, and z directions, but the booths have gyration similar to Ferris Wheels, so they always stay upright. What I've found to be important in the spectacle of mechanized amusements is that it's just as thrilling to watch them as it is to ride them, so the end product of this project will (in addition to plan and section drawings) include a series of animations depicting whatever this "thing" is on it and the visual experience it has on the street.

    http://i.imgur.com/KjU7QhG.png

    (Special Thanks to Code for Scripting Assistance!)
    POV
    Off-Ride

    Again, I'm barely at the halfway point and parts about my project can change. But regardless, it was a lot of work, research, and reading to get to the point I am now and I realize it's really theoretical. So this leads me to ask: is this something you would all be interested in seeing progress of as I work throughout the semester? As you can see, NL2 is playing a huge role in visualizing these ideas. I really want to change the way we think about what we already know so much about on these forums. I also left a LOT of visual material from my presentation like digital drawings, diagrams, mappings, and timelines, so if you are interested in seeing me post those as well, let me know.
    • CommentAuthorkryptos001
    • CommentTimeDec 31st 2016
     
    The roller coaster restaurant looks fun and I can see how it could better show off a city that a normal rotating restaurant, but there are some issues that come to mind. Please note that I don't mean to criticize your work but instead ask questions that lead to an even stronger thesis.

    First, it looks like there would be a certain area where people load/unload using a moving sidewalk (like Rip Ride Rockit's station). This brings up the point that guests can only leave at certain times during the ride; they are basically trapped until then. What if they want to get off earlier? What if the station is quickly approaching while theyre still eating, would they feel rushed to finish eating or end up taking another lap? The other question I have is about universal design: what is your plan for handicapped guests and families with small children? Is there access for those with wheelchairs? Can small children be "restrained" in a way to make sure they don't fall off the table?

    Now for the actual question you asked, I would be very interested in seeing more updates, visuals, brainstormings, etc throughout the semester. This project has the potential to pop up in several major cities, so it would be fun to see how your train of thought evolves throughout the project.
    • CommentAuthorA113
    • CommentTimeMar 9th 2017 edited
     
    Those are all valid points that have been taken into consideration as I've been iterating through ideas. Now in my final few months of the project, I'm getting close to committing to a layout on two different sites in Minneapolis. I haven't had anything presentable to share yet, but I made this brief animation of one of my recent studies, which is a hybrid of a people mover, monorail, and ferris wheel, enabling movement in all 3 axes. This is integrated with the idea of mobility of spaces, such as the example most prominent in the video, an office with detachable conference room. Hypothetically, this area would be a "stop" that is a part of a larger route through the city, and one of the two sites I have been designing in. What you see was animated in Maya, no scripts used other than bestdani's new camera script.

    Again, I realize this is out there for what's usually posted around here, I have just been trying to use my thesis as an opportunity to explore what can be done differently. (Click image for video)

    https://i.gyazo.com/e16039d497d24b4b97a0bf719633ca49.png
  5.  
    Very cool as always A113.